Last edited by Tauzil
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

4 edition of Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe found in the catalog.

Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe

Susan Dackerman

Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe

by Susan Dackerman

  • 164 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Harvard Art Museums, Yale University Press [distributor] in Cambridge, Mass, New Haven [Conn.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sociology of Knowledge,
  • Exhibitions,
  • Intellectual life,
  • Art and science,
  • European Prints,
  • Renaissance Prints

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Susan Dackerman ; with essays by Susan Dackerman ... [et al.].
    ContributionsHarvard Art Museum, Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsNE625 .P745 2011
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24853200M
    ISBN 109781891771583, 9780300171075
    LC Control Number2011017918

    Prints in Translation, – Image, Materiality, Space by. Refresh and try again. Rate this book. Clear rating. 1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars. Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe by. Susan Dackerman (Editor), Claudia Swan (Contributor),/5(3).   Dürer’s Apocalypse series () was the first printed book in Europe to be illustrated and published by an artist, and it captures the zeitgeist of Europe on the cusp of the sixteenth century — a time that according to enthusiastic millenarians would signal the end of the world as described in John’s hallucinatory visions recorded in the Bible book of Revelation.

    Prints + Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe | Block Museum Heads up! We’re working hard to be accurate – but these are unusual times, so please always check before heading out.   "Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe" is an engrossing exhibition that offers a varied and extensive look at art that served to disseminate knowledge in 16th-century.

      E-BOOK_PAPERBACK LIBRARY The Visualization of Knowledge in Medieval and Early Modern Europe Studies in the Visual Cultures of the Middle Ages 'Full_Pages' Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. This interdisciplinary collection explores how the early modern pursuit of knowledge in very different spheres – from Inquisitional investigations to biblical polemics to popular healing – was conditioned by a shared desire for certainty, and how epistemological crises produced by the religious upheavals of early modern Europe were also.


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Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe by Susan Dackerman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe features fascinating reproductions of woodcuts, engravings, and etchings; maps, globe gores, and globes; multilayered anatomical "flap" prints; and paper scientific instruments used for observation and measurement.

Among the "do-it-yourself" paper instruments were sundials and astrolabes, and the book incorporates a 5/5(4). Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe.

~~New editions of Ptolemy’s Geography, advances in navigation, interest in expanded trade routes, and the desire for greater knowledge of the world drove an enormous growth in the making and use of maps in the sixteenth by: Get this from a library.

Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe. [Susan Dackerman; Harvard Art Museums.; Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art.;] -- An unusual collaboration among distinguished art historians and historians of science, this book demonstrates how printmakers of the Northern Renaissance, far from merely illustrating the ideas of.

Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe. Winner, International Fine Print Dealers Association (IFPDA) Book Award. An unusual collaboration among distinguished art historians, historians of science, and their students, this book demonstrates how printmakers of the Northern Renaissance, far from merely illustrating the ideas of others, contributed to scientific investigations.

Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe by Susan Dackerman,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(11). Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge examines how celebrated Northern Renaissance artists contributed to the scientific investigations of the 16th century.

The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue challenge the perception of artists as illustrators in the service of scientists. Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe examines how celebrated Northern Renaissance artists contributed to scientific inquiries of the 16th century.

Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe is the catalog from a recent eponymous exhibition at Harvard's Arthur M. Sackler Museum. (The exhibition is currently on view at the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, through April 8, ) Weighing in at a hefty pounds and sporting an embossed reproduction of the head of Albrecht.

Print and the Power of Religious Knowledge The first book printed with movable type was Gutenberg’s Bible. G Gutenberg started off printing forty lines per page but began printing forty-two lines per page instead. S Scribes, on the other hand, only wrote thirty-six lines per page in earlier bibles.

Add to Book Bag Remove from Book Bag. Saved in: Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe / Bibliographic Details; Corporate Authors: Harvard Art Museums., the reproductive print in Europe, / by: Zorach, Rebecca, Published: () Altered.

Susan Dackerman, ed. Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe. Exh. Cat. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Art Museums, pp. $ ISBN: –0–––5. This sumptuously produced catalogue is groundbreaking. Susan Dackerman and her team have gathered together, analyzed, and contextualized a vast body of.

Information from the museum, 23 November Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in Early Modern Europe examines the participation of artists in the scientific inquiries of the sixteenth century.

By investigating the close working relationships between the artistic and scientific communities, it attempts to break down the artificial boundaries of interpretation between the work of artists. Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe Susan Dackerman has done it again.

Her first major print exhibition dropped jaws and opened eyes to an early graphic phenomenon known only partially but originally widespread: Painted Prints (Baltimore Museum of Art, ). Part of HuffPost Entertainment. © Verizon Media.

All rights reserved. Huffington Post. Prints and the pursuit of knowledge in early modern Europe / Bibliographic Details; Corporate Authors: Search for the book on E-ZBorrow. Pop impressions Europe/USA: prints and multiples from the Museum of Modern Art / by: Weitman, Wendy. The Strange Beauty of Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge.

On exhibition at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum of the Harvard Art Museums Fall, Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe examines how celebrated Northern Renaissance artists contributed to the scientific investigations of the 16th exhibition and its accompanying catalogue challenge.

Knowledge of the self in pursuit of salvation, humanistic knowledge within a confessional education, as well as inherently subversive knowledge acquired about religion(s) offer instructive instances of this interplay. contributions to our knowledge of the connections between religion and different kinds of knowledge in early modern Europe.

Many leading Renaissance artist's etchings and block prints are included-Durer & Goltzius among them. A wealth of obscure and marvelous images of scientific themes are included and range from Astrology, Cartography, Natural History, Anthropology, Anatomy to.

The fruits of knowledge—such as books, data, and ideas—tend to generate far more attention than the ways in which knowledge is produced and acquired. Correcting this imbalance, Making Knowledge in Early Modern Europe brings together a wide-ranging yet tightly integrated series of essays that explore how knowledge was obtained and demonstrated in Europe during an intellectually explosive.

Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe Edited by Susan Dackerman; With essays by Susan Dackerman, Lorraine Daston, Katharine Park, Suzanne Karr Schmidt, and Claudia Swan; pages, color illustrations; Published by Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge MA and distributed by Yale University Press, ; $.

Durer's Indexical Fantasy: The Rhinoceros and Printmaking; in Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe, Harvard Art Museums with Yale University Press, Curator Susan Dackerman provides an overview of the exhibition "Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe," which was on view September 6—Decem at the Arthur M.

Sackler Museum.Investigating the relationship between archives and information in the early modern world, this latest collection of essays edited by Kate Peters, Alexandra Walsham, and Liesbeth Corens explores every aspect of record keeping; from the proliferation of physical documentation between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries to the implication of archives in patterns of statecraft.